Tag Archives: behaviour management

How to Parent Your Teenager

How to Parent Your Teenager.
Their world has drastically changed.  Parents need to change, too.

We have met the enemy. And he is us. (Pogo)

You Are Your Teenager’s Parent, Not Boss

Parents: don’t be your own worst enemy. Teenagers are still your children. You are still their parent. But you are no longer their boss. You’ve been fired.

Your task now is to get rehired as a consultant. This will happen only when they want it–not when you want it. But you can do things that will give yourself a reasonable chance to get “back in your teenager’s good graces,” so that he or she is willing to cooperate with you much more and be less defiant, as I will show you.

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Old & New School Parenting Methods

Old & New School Parenting Methods

Old School Parenting Methods

Here is a brief listing of some of the most popular methods that 99% of our parents (and eons of parents before them) used in order to bring us, as children, into line with their wishes and demands.

The goal of discipline in the Old School approach to parenting was, and still is, obedience. It features a heavy dose of punishment for disobedience, and this punishment is intended to “teach the child a lesson,” which can generally be interpreted to mean “scare the child into submission.” By inflicting some kind of pain or deprivation, the punishment is meant to deter child misbehavior and disobedience in the future. These methods focus on dealing with children on the corporal or physical level.

With the exception of physical punishment, these methods are not necessarily “wrong” or “bad,” but they are too often ineffective with strong-willed, autonomous, or rebellious children of all ages. Here’s a listing of the most common Old School methods or techniques.

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Controlling Child Behavior

Controlling Child Behavior

Controlling child behavior is a tricky business. It presents significant problems for parents, teachers, and everyone who works with children in any way whatsoever.

The problem we face is that children do not always want to do what we want them to. Age of the child has nothing to do with it. They too often just don’t like to be told what to do. And then we are faced with the challenge of what to do to get them to behave the way we want.

Obviously, there is no easy answer. We don’t have remote of their brain! So how is a frustrated parent supposed to approach the vexing topic controlling child behavior?

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